Winning Support for BDD

Adopting behavior-driven development practices can greatly improve software quality and productivity, but like any big change, it will have opponents along with supporters. I’ve met resistance from all roles: testers, developers, product owners, and managers. And some people can be stubborn. As with any proposal, the best way to win support is not just to tell the benefits but to demonstrate them. Below are five major ways to demonstrate the benefits of BDD.

Make it a Refinement, not an Overhaul

I remember talking with a scrum master one time about challenges his team faced with testing and automation. The user stories his team wrote were a mess: they may or may not have had acceptance criteria, and the product owner would often ask for features to be scrapped or redone after a sprint or two. The team basically gave up on automated testing due to feature flux. Naturally, I proposed BDD to him, suggesting that it could help drive better features through formalization. However, this scrum master balked at the idea: “My team is stretched so thin right now, there’s no way we can overhaul our process right now.”

Clearly, the team had a serious problem, but they weren’t willing to try any solution deemed too “big.” The scrum master’s perception was that BDD would be a disruptive change that would hurt them more than help them. In cases like this, it is best to present BDD as a refinement of Agile, and not an overhaul of it. Agile says user stories should have acceptance criteria; BDD says acceptance criteria should be formalized. Agile says that the definition of done should include test automation; BDD says automation is a natural extension of the acceptance criteria. There’s nothing in Agile that BDD undoes, and there are shortcomings in Agile that BDD solves.

Write Good Gherkin

There is a big difference between Gherkin and good Gherkin. Anyone can add BDD buzzwords to existing test procedures, but effective BDD needs a paradigm shift. Unfortunately, bad Gherkin can ruin many of the benefits BDD can bring. For example, imperative steps will frustrate product owners, and mixed point-of-view will confuse testers. Nothing will ever be truly perfect, but it is important to strive for good Gherkin from the start, especially when the first behavior scenarios will often be used as examples for future scenarios.

Start the Automation Snowball

BDD and automation go together like peas and carrots. Not only can test automation shift left (since Gherkin scenarios are both acceptance criteria and tests), but steps can be implemented once and reused by any scenarios. When the first BDD scenarios are written, obviously all steps are new steps. As sprints pass, though, many common steps will likely be reused. I’ve even written new scenarios without adding any new steps!

Test automation is often the last thing to be done for a story, if it’s even reached at all. The inherent step reusability helps BDD automation get done sooner. It may take a while to build up useful, reusable steps in the code base, but they will cause an “automation snowball” once they are there. Imagine telling your team that the test automation is already done once a scenario is written in Gherkin!

Take Baby Steps

Rome wasn’t built in a day, and neither will a mature BDD process be. People take time to adjust to new paradigms. Start out slow, and do it right. Train the team how to write good Gherkin. Try a few stories one sprint, rather than taking on the whole backlog. For a product-owner-led approach, start with Gherkinizing acceptance criteria for a sprint or two before attempting any automation. Alternatively, for a test-led approach, work on the automation framework first, and then start to shift the scenario writing left to the developers and then to the product owners once the snowball gets bigger.

It’s okay if things aren’t perfect at first. Learn the lessons and iterate for improvement. Take baby steps!

Highlight how Everyone Wins

BDD is truly a win/win for everyone. It’s not a way to shuffle responsibilities or push around busywork, it’s a way to make a team more interdependent upon each other. Each role in the Three Amigos is empowered to do the right things, with support from each other in lock-step. Consider how BDD process changes help each role work together better:

Role New Responsibility Interdependent Benefit
Product Owner Learn to express requirements in a more formalized, slightly techy way Better assurance that features will be what they actually want, be working correctly, and be protected against future regressions
Developer Contribute more to grooming and test planning Less likely to develop the wrong thing or to be “held up” by testing
Tester Build and learn a new automation framework Automation will snowball, allowing them to meet sprint commitments and focus extra time on exploratory testing
Everyone Another meeting or two Better communication and fewer problems

 

Nobody on an Agile team can rightly say, “BDD isn’t useful to me.” Software quality is everyone’s responsibility, and BDD is a great way to improve it.

One thought on “Winning Support for BDD

  1. Pingback: Who Should Lead BDD? – Automation Panda

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