Selenium

Test-Driving TestProject’s New Python SDK

TestProject recently released its new OpenSDK, and one of its major features is the inclusion of Python testing support! Since I love using Python for test automation, I couldn’t wait to give it a try. This article is my crash-course tutorial on writing Web UI tests in Python with TestProject.

What is TestProject?

TestProject is a free end-to-end test automation platform for Web, mobile, and API tests. It provides a cloud-based way to teams to build, run, share, and analyze tests. Manual testers can visually build tests for desktop or mobile sites using TestProject’s in-browser recorder and test builder. Automation engineers can use TestProject’s SDKs in Java, C#, and now Python for developing coded test automation solutions, and they can use packages already developed by others in the community through TestProject’s add-ons. Whether manual or automated, TestProject displays all test results in a sleek reporting dashboard with helpful analytics. And all of these features are legitimately free – there’s no tiered model or service plan.

Recently, TestProject announced the official release of its new OpenSDK. This new SDK (“software development kit”) provides a simple, unified interface for running tests with TestProject across multiple platforms and languages (now including Python). Things look exciting for the future of TestProject!

What’s My Interest?

It’s no secret that I love testing with Python. When I heard that TestProject added Python support, I knew I had to give it a try. I never used TestProject before, but I was interested to learn what it could do. Specifically, I wanted to see the value it could bring to reporting automated tests. In the Python space, test automation is slick, but reporting can be rough since frameworks like pytest and unittest are command-line-focused. I also wanted to see if TestProject’s SDK would genuinely help me automate tests or if it would get it my way. Furthermore, I know some great people in the TestProject community, so I figured it was time to jump in myself!

The Python SDK

TestProject’s Python SDK is an open-source project. It was originally developed by Bas Dijkstra, with the support of the TestProject team, and its code is hosted on GitHub. The Python SDK supports Selenium for Web UI automation (which will be the focus for this tutorial) and Appium for Android and iOS UI automation as well!

Since I’d never used TestProject before, let alone this new Python SDK, I wanted to review the code to see how to use it. Thankfully, the README included lots of helpful information and example code. When I looked at the code for TestProject’s BaseDriver, I discovered that it simply extend’s Selenium WebDriver’s RemoteDriver class. That means all the TestProject WebDrivers use exactly the same API as Python’s Selenium WebDriver implementation. To me, that was a big relief. I know WebDriver’s API very well, so I wouldn’t need to learn anything different in order to use TestProject. It also means that any test automation project can be easily retrofitted to use TestProject’s SDKs – they just need to swap in a new WebDriver object!

Setup Steps

TestProject has a straightforward architecture. Users sign up for free TestProject accounts online. Then, they set up their own machines for running tests. Each testing machine must have the TestProject agent installed and linked to a user’s account. When tests run, agents automatically push results to the TestProject cloud. Users can then log into the TestProject portal to view and analyze results. They can invite team mates to share results, and they can also set up multiple test machines with agents. Users can even integrate TestProject with other tools like Jenkins, qTest, and Sauce Labs. The TestProject docs, especially the ecosystem diagram, explain everything in more detail.

When I did my test drive, I created a TestProject account, installed the agent on my Mac, and ran Python Web UI tests from my Mac. I already had the latest version of Python installed (Python 3.8 at the time of writing this article). I also already had my target browsers installed: Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox.

Below are the precise steps I followed to set up TestProject:

1. Sign up for an account

TestProject accounts are “free forever.” Use this signup link.

The TestProject signup page

2. Download the TestProject Agent

The signup wizard should direct you to download the TestProject agent. If not, you can always download it from the TestProject dashboard. Be warned, the download package is pretty large – the macOS package was 345 MB. Alternatively, you can fetch the agent as a container image from Docker Hub.

The TestProject agent download page

The TestProject agent contains all the stuff needed to run tests and upload results to the TestProject app in the cloud. You don’t need to install WebDriver executables like ChromeDriver or geckodriver. Once the agent is downloaded, install it on the machine and register the agent with your account. For me, registration happened automatically.

This is what the TestProject agent looks like when running on macOS. You can also close this window to let it run in the background.

3. Find your developer token

You’ll need to use your developer token to connect your automated tests to your account in the TestProject app. The signup wizard should reveal it to you, but you can always find it (and also reset it) on the Integrations page.

The Integrations page. Check here for your developer token. No, you can’t use mine.

4. Install the Python SDK

TestProject’s Python SDK is distributed as a package through PyPI. To install it, simply run pip install testproject-python-sdk at the command line. This package will also install dependencies like selenium and requests.

A Classic Web UI Test

After setting up my Mac to use TestProject, it was time to write some Web UI tests in Python! Since I discovered that TestProject’s WebDriver objects could easily retrofit any existing test automation project, I thought, “What if I try to run my PyCon 2020 tutorial project with TestProject?” For PyCon 2020, I gave an online tutorial about building a Web UI test automation project in Python from the ground up using pytest and Selenium WebDriver. The tutorial includes one test case: a DuckDuckGo web search and verification. I thought it would be easy to integrate with TestProject since I already had the code. Thankfully, it was!

Below, I’ll walk though my code. You can check out my example project repository from GitHub at AndyLPK247/testproject-python-sdk-example. My code will be a bit more advanced than the examples shown in the Python SDK’s README or in Bas Dijkstra’s tutorial article because it uses the Page Object Model and pytest fixtures. Make sure to pip install pytest, too.

1. Write the test steps

The test case covers a simple DuckDuckGo web search. Whenever I automate tests, I always write out the steps in plain language. Good tests follow the Arrange-Act-Assert pattern, and I like to use Gherkin’s Given-When-Then phrasing. Here’s the test case:

Scenario: Basic DuckDuckGo Web Search
    Given the DuckDuckGo home page is displayed
    When the user searches for "panda"
    Then the search result query is "panda"
    And the search result links pertain to "panda"
    And the search result title contains "panda"

2. Specify automation inputs

Inputs configure how automated tests run. They can be passed into a test automation solution using configuration files. Testers can then easily change input values in the config file without changing code. Automation should read config files once at the start of testing and inject necessary inputs into every test case.

In Python, I like to use JSON for config files. JSON data is simple and hierarchical, and Python includes a module in its standard library named json that can parse a JSON file into a Python dictionary in one line. I also like to put config files either in the project root directory or in the tests directory.

Here’s the contents of config.json for this test:

{
  "browser": "Chrome",
  "implicit_wait": 10,
  "testproject_projectname": "TestProject Python SDK Example",
  "testproject_token": ""
}
  • browser is the name of the browser to test
  • implicit_wait is the implicit waiting timeout for the WebDriver instance
  • testproject_projectname is the project name to use for this test suite in the TestProject app
  • testproject_token is the developer token

3. Read automation inputs

Automation code should read inputs one time before any tests run and then inject inputs into appropriate tests. pytest fixtures make this easy to do.

I created a fixture named config in the tests/conftest.py module to read config.json:

import json
import pytest


@pytest.fixture
def config(scope='session'):

  # Read the file
  with open('config.json') as config_file:
    config = json.load(config_file)
  
  # Assert values are acceptable
  assert config['browser'] in ['Firefox', 'Chrome', 'Headless Chrome']
  assert isinstance(config['implicit_wait'], int)
  assert config['implicit_wait'] > 0
  assert config['testproject_projectname'] != ""
  assert config['testproject_token'] != ""

  # Return config so it can be used
  return config

Setting the fixture’s scope to “session” means that it will run only one time for the whole test suite. The fixture reads the JSON config file, parses its text into a Python dictionary, and performs basic input validation. Note that Firefox, Chrome, and Headless Chrome will be supported browsers.

4. Set up WebDriver

Each Web UI test should have its own WebDriver instance so that it remains independent from other tests. Once again, pytest fixtures make setup easy.

The browser fixture in tests/conftest.py initialize the appropriate TestProject WebDriver type based on inputs returned by the config fixture:

from selenium.webdriver import ChromeOptions
from src.testproject.sdk.drivers import webdriver


@pytest.fixture
def browser(config):

  # Initialize shared arguments
  kwargs = {
    'projectname': config['testproject_projectname'],
    'token': config['testproject_token']
  }

  # Initialize the TestProject WebDriver instance
  if config['browser'] == 'Firefox':
    b = webdriver.Firefox(**kwargs)
  elif config['browser'] == 'Chrome':
    b = webdriver.Chrome(**kwargs)
  elif config['browser'] == 'Headless Chrome':
    opts = ChromeOptions()
    opts.add_argument('headless')
    b = webdriver.Chrome(chrome_options=opts, **kwargs)
  else:
    raise Exception(f'Browser "{config["browser"]}" is not supported')

  # Make its calls wait for elements to appear
  b.implicitly_wait(config['implicit_wait'])

  # Return the WebDriver instance for the setup
  yield b

  # Quit the WebDriver instance for the cleanup
  b.quit()

This was the only section of code I needed to change to make my PyCon 2020 tutorial project work with TestProject. I had to change the WebDriver invocations to use the TestProject classes. I also had to add arguments for the project name and developer token, which come from the config file. (Note: you may alternatively set the developer token as an environment variable.)

5. Create page objects

Automated tests could make direct calls to the WebDriver interface to interact with the browser, but WebDriver calls are typically low-level and wordy. The Page Object Model is a much better design pattern. Page object classes encapsulate WebDriver gorp so that tests can call simpler, more readable methods.

The DuckDuckGo search test interacts with two pages: the search page and the result page. The pages package contains a module for each page. Here’s pages/search.py:

from selenium.webdriver.common.by import By
from selenium.webdriver.common.keys import Keys


class DuckDuckGoSearchPage:

  URL = 'https://www.duckduckgo.com'

  SEARCH_INPUT = (By.ID, 'search_form_input_homepage')

  def __init__(self, browser):
    self.browser = browser

  def load(self):
    self.browser.get(self.URL)

  def search(self, phrase):
    search_input = self.browser.find_element(*self.SEARCH_INPUT)
    search_input.send_keys(phrase + Keys.RETURN)

And here’s pages/result.py:

from selenium.webdriver.common.by import By

class DuckDuckGoResultPage:
  
  RESULT_LINKS = (By.CSS_SELECTOR, 'a.result__a')
  SEARCH_INPUT = (By.ID, 'search_form_input')

  def __init__(self, browser):
    self.browser = browser

  def result_link_titles(self):
    links = self.browser.find_elements(*self.RESULT_LINKS)
    titles = [link.text for link in links]
    return titles
  
  def search_input_value(self):
    search_input = self.browser.find_element(*self.SEARCH_INPUT)
    value = search_input.get_attribute('value')
    return value

  def title(self):
    return self.browser.title

Notice that this code uses the “regular” WebDriver interface because TestProject’s WebDriver classes extend the Selenium WebDriver classes.

To make setup easier, I added fixtures to tests/conftest.py to construct each page object, too. They call the browser fixture and inject the WebDriver instance into each page object:

from pages.result import DuckDuckGoResultPage
from pages.search import DuckDuckGoSearchPage


@pytest.fixture
def search_page(browser):
  return DuckDuckGoSearchPage(browser)


@pytest.fixture
def result_page(browser):
  return DuckDuckGoResultPage(browser)

6. Automate the test case

All the automation plumbing is finally in place. Here’s the test case in tests/traditional/test_duckduckgo.py:

import pytest


@pytest.mark.parametrize('phrase', ['panda', 'python', 'polar bear'])
def test_basic_duckduckgo_search(search_page, result_page, phrase):
  
  # Given the DuckDuckGo home page is displayed
  search_page.load()

  # When the user searches for the phrase
  search_page.search(phrase)

  # Then the search result query is the phrase
  assert phrase == result_page.search_input_value()
  
  # And the search result links pertain to the phrase
  titles = result_page.result_link_titles()
  matches = [t for t in titles if phrase.lower() in t.lower()]
  assert len(matches) > 0

  # And the search result title contains the phrase
  assert phrase in result_page.title()

I parametrized the test to run it for three different phrases. The test function does not interact with the WebDriver instance directly. Instead, it interacts exclusively with the page objects.

7. Run the tests

The tests run like any other pytest tests: python -m pytest at the command line. If everything is set up correctly, then the tests will run successfully and upload results to the TestProject app.

In the TestProject dashboard, the Reports tab shows all the test you have run. It also shows the different test projects you have.

Check out those results!

You can also drill into results for individual test case runs. TestProject automatically records the browser type, timestamps, pass-or-fail results, and every WebDriver call. You can also download PDF reports!

Results for an individual test

What if … BDD?

I was delighted to see how easily I could run a traditional pytest suite using TestProject. Then, I thought to myself, “What if I could use a BDD test framework?” I personally love Behavior-Driven Development, and Python has multiple BDD test frameworks. There is no reason why a BDD test framework wouldn’t work with TestProject!

So, I rewrote the DuckDuckGo search test as a feature file with step definitions using pytest-bdd. The BDD-style test uses the same fixtures and page objects as the traditional test.

Here’s the Gherkin scenario in tests/bdd/features/duckduckgo.feature:

Feature: DuckDuckGo
  As a Web surfer,
  I want to search for websites using plain-language phrases,
  So that I can learn more about the world around me.


  Scenario Outline: Basic DuckDuckGo Web Search
    Given the DuckDuckGo home page is displayed
    When the user searches for "<phrase>"
    Then the search result query is "<phrase>"
    And the search result links pertain to "<phrase>"
    And the search result title contains "<phrase>"

    Examples:
      | phrase     |
      | panda      |
      | python     |
      | polar bear |

And here’s the step definition module in tests/bdd/step_defs/test_duckduckgo_bdd.py:

from pytest_bdd import scenarios, given, when, then, parsers
from selenium.webdriver.common.keys import Keys


scenarios('../features/duckduckgo.feature')


@given('the DuckDuckGo home page is displayed')
def load_duckduckgo(search_page):
  search_page.load()


@when(parsers.parse('the user searches for "{phrase}"'))
@when('the user searches for "<phrase>"')
def search_phrase(search_page, phrase):
  search_page.search(phrase)


@then(parsers.parse('the search result query is "{phrase}"'))
@then('the search result query is "<phrase>"')
def check_search_result_query(result_page, phrase):
  assert phrase == result_page.search_input_value()


@then(parsers.parse('the search result links pertain to "{phrase}"'))
@then('the search result links pertain to "<phrase>"')
def check_search_result_links(result_page, phrase):
  titles = result_page.result_link_titles()
  matches = [t for t in titles if phrase.lower() in t.lower()]
  assert len(matches) > 0


@then(parsers.parse('the search result title contains "{phrase}"'))
@then('the search result title contains "<phrase>"')
def check_search_result_title(result_page, phrase):
  assert phrase in result_page.title()

There’s one more nifty trick I added with pytest-bdd. I added a hook to report each Gherkin step to TestProject with a screenshot! That way, testers can trace each test case step more easily in the TestProject reports. Capturing screenshots also greatly assists test triage when failures arise. This hook is located in tests/conftest.py:

def pytest_bdd_after_step(request, feature, scenario, step, step_func):
  browser = request.getfixturevalue('browser')
  browser.report().step(description=str(step), message=str(step), passed=True, screenshot=True)

Since pytest-bdd is just a pytest plugin, its tests run using the same python -m pytest command. TestProject will group these test results into the same project as before, but it will separate the traditional tests from the BDD tests by name. Here’s what the Gherkin steps with screenshots look like:

Custom Gherkin step with screenshot reported in the TestProject app

This is Awesome!

As its name denotes, TestProject is a great platform for handling project-level concerns for testing work: reporting, integrations, and fast feedback. Adding TestProject to an existing automation solution feels seamless, and its sleek user experience gives me what I need as a tester without getting in my way. The one word that keeps coming to mind is “simple” – TestProject simplifies setup and sharing. Its design takes to heart the renowned Python adage, “Simple is better than complex.” As such, TestProject’s new Python SDK is a welcome addition to the Python testing ecosystem.

I look forward to exploring Python support for mobile testing with Appium soon. I also look forward to seeing all the new Python add-ons the community will develop.

Beyond Unit Tests: End-to-End Web UI Testing

On October 4, 2019, I gave a talk entitled Beyond Unit Tests: End-to-End Web UI Testing at PyGotham 2019. Check it out below! I show how to write a concise-yet-complete test solution for Web UI test cases using Python, pytest, and Selenium WebDriver.

This talk is a condensed version of my Hands-On Web UI Testing tutorials that I delivered at DjangoCon 2019 and PyOhio 2019. If you’d like to take the full tutorial, check out https://github.com/AndyLPK247/djangocon-2019-web-ui-testing. Full instructions are in the README.

Be sure to check out the other PyGotham 2019 talks, too. My favorite was Dungeons & Dragons & Python: Epic Adventures with Prompt-Toolkit and Friends by Mike Pirnat.

Hands-On UI Testing with Python (SmartBear Webinar)

On August 14, 2019, I teamed up with SmartBear to deliver a one-hour webinar about Web UI testing with Python! It was an honor to work with Nicholas Brown, Digital Marketing Manager for CrossBrowserTesting at SmartBear Software, to make this webinar happen.

The Webinar

Source: https://crossbrowsertesting.com/resources/webinars/testing-with-python

In the webinar, I showed how to build a basic Web UI test automation solution using Python, pytest, and Selenium WebDriver. The tutorial covered automating one test, a simple DuckDuckGo search, from inception to automation. It also showed how to use CrossBrowserTesting to scale the solution so that it can run tests on any browser, any platform, and any version in the cloud as a service!

The example test project for the webinar is hosted in Github here: https://github.com/AndyLPK247/smartbear-hands-on-ui-testing-python

I encourage you to clone the Github repository and try to run the example test on your own! Make sure to get a CrossBrowserTesting trial license so you can try different browsers. You can also try to write new tests of your own. All instructions are in the README. Have fun with it!

The Q&A

After the tutorial, we took questions from the audience. Here are answers to the top questions:

How can we automate UI interactions for CAPTCHA?

CAPTCHA is a feature many websites use to determine whether or not a user is human. Most CAPTCHAs require the user to read obscured text from an image, but there are other variations. By their very nature, CAPTCHAs are designed to thwart UI automation.

When someone asked this question during the webinar, I didn’t have an answer, so I did some research afterwards. Unfortunately, it looks like there’s no easy solution. The best workarounds involve driving apps through their APIs to avoid CAPTCHAs. I also saw some services that offer to solve CAPTCHAs.

Are there any standard Page Object Pattern implementations in Python?

Not really. Mozilla maintains the PyPOM project, but I personally haven’t used it. I like to keep my page objects pretty simple, as shown in the tutorial. I also recommend the Screenplay Pattern, which handles concerns better as test automation solutions grow larger. I’m actually working on a Pythonic implementation of the Screenplay Pattern that I hope to release soon!

How can I run Python tests that use Selenium WebDriver and pytest from Jenkins?

Any major Continuous Integration tool like Jenkins can easily run Web UI tests in any major language. First, make sure the nodes are properly configured to run the tests – they’ll need Python with the appropriate packages. If you plan to use local browsers, make sure the nodes have the browsers and WebDriver executables properly installed. If you plan to use remote browsers (like with CrossBrowserTesting), make sure your CI environment can call out to the remote service. Test jobs can simply call pytest from the command line to launch the tests. I also recommend the “JUnit” pytest option to generate a JUnit-style XML test report because most CI tools require that format for displaying and tracking test results.

How can I combine API and database testing with Web UI testing?

One way to handle API and database testing is to write integration tests separate from Web UI tests. You can still use pytest, but you’d use a library like requests for APIs and SQLAlchemy for databases.

Another approach is to write “hybrid” tests that use APIs and database calls to help Web UI testing. Browsers are notoriously slow compared to direct back-end calls. For example, database calls could pre-populate data so that, upon login, the website already displays stuff to test. Hybrid tests can make tests much faster and much safer.

How can we test mobile apps and browsers using Python?

Even though our tutorial covered desktop-based browser UI interactions, the strategy for testing mobile apps and browsers is the same. Mobile tests need Appium, which is like a special version of WebDriver for mobile features. The Page Object Pattern (or Screenplay Pattern) still applies. CrossBrowserTesting provides mobile platforms, too!

Tutorial: Web Testing Made Easy with Python

Have you ever discovered a bug in a web app? Yuck! Almost everyone has. Bugs look bad, interrupt the user’s experience, and cheapen the web app’s value. Severe bugs can incur serious business costs and tarnish the provider’s reputation.

So, how can we prevent these bugs from reaching users? The best way to catch bugs is to test the web app. However, web UI testing can be difficult: it requires more effort than unit testing, and it has a bad rap for being flaky.

Never fear! Recently, I teamed up with the awesome folks at TestProject to develop a helpful tutorial that makes web UI test automation easy with the power of Python! The tutorial is named Web Testing Made Easy with Python, Pytest and Selenium WebDriver. It is available for free as a set of TestProject blog articles together with a GitHub example project.

In our tutorial, we will build a simple yet robust web UI test solution using Pythonpytest, and Selenium WebDriver. We cover strategies for good test design as well as patterns for good automation code. By the end of the tutorial, you’ll be a web test automation champ! Your Python test project can be the foundation for your own test cases, too.

How can you take the tutorial? Start reading here, and follow the instructions: https://blog.testproject.io/2019/07/16/open-source-test-automation-python-pytest-selenium-webdriver/

I personally want to thank TestProject for this collaboration. TestProject provides helpful tools that can supercharge your test automation. They offer a smart test recorder, a bunch of add-ons that act like test case building blocks, an SDK that can make test automation coding easier, and beautiful analytics to see exactly what the tests are doing. Not only is TestProject a cool platform, but the people with whom I’ve worked there are great. Be sure to check it out!

WebDriver Element Existence vs. Appearance

Web UI tests with Selenium WebDriver must interact with elements on a Web page. Locating elements can be tricky because expected elements may or may not be on the page. Furthermore, WebDriver might not be able to interact with some elements that exist on the page. That may seem crazy, but let’s understand why.

Web UI interactions universally follow these steps:

  1. Wait for an element to be ready.
  2. Get the element using a locator (ID, CSS selector, XPath, etc.).
  3. Send commands (like clicking or typing) or queries (like getting text) to the element.

Clearly, an element must be “ready” before interactions can happen. As humans, we intuitively define “ready” as, “The page is loaded, and the element is visible.” Automation code is a bit more technical because there are two different ways to define readiness:

  1. Existence: the element exists in the HTML structure of the page.
  2. Appearance: the element exists and it is visible on the page.

Existence can easily be determined by WebDriver’s “find elements” method. The plural “find elements” method will return a list of all elements matching a locator query. If no elements match the locator, then an empty list is returned. The singular “find element” method, on the other hand, will return the first element matching the locator or throw an exception if no elements are found. Thus, the plural version is more convenient to use for checking existence.

Here’s an example existence method in C#:

public bool Exists(IWebDriver driver, By locator) =>
    driver.FindElements(locator).Count > 0;

Checking for existence is the most basic level of readiness. If an element doesn’t exist, interactions with it simply cannot happen. However, existence alone may not be sufficient for interactions. Selenium WebDriver requires elements to not only exist but also to be displayed for interactions like sending clicks and scraping text. Existing elements may be scrolled out of view or even deliberately hidden. WebDriver calls to such elements will yield cryptic exceptions. That’s why waiting for appearance is usually the better readiness condition.

Here’s an example appearance method in C#:

// Assume that the locator targets one element, not multiple
public bool Appears(IWebDriver driver, By locator) =>
    Exists(driver, locator) && driver.FindElement(locator).Displayed;

Existence must be checked first, or else the “Displayed” call will throw an exception whenever existence is false.

Putting it all together, here’s what a button click interaction could look like in C#:

// Assume this is a method in a Page Object class
// Assume that "Driver" is the WebDriver instance
public void ClickThatButton()
{
    var button = By.Id("that-button");
    var wait = new WebDriverWait(Driver, new System.Timespan(0, 0, 15));
    wait.Until((driver) => Appears(driver, button));
    Driver.FindElement(button).Click();
}

It’s good practice to make explicit waits before locating and using elements. It’s also good practice to get fresh elements for every interaction call in order to avoid pesky stale element exceptions. Calls like these should be placed in Page Object methods or Screenplay Pattern tasks and questions so that interactions are safe and thorough.

Appearance may not always be the right choice. There may be times when a test should check if an element doesn’t exist or if an element exists but is hidden. Just think before you code.

Web Element Locators for Test Automation

Do you want a full course? Check out Web Element Locator Strategies on Test Automation University!

If you do any Web UI test automation (like with Selenium WebDriver), then you probably spend a large chunk of your test development time finding elements on a page, like buttons, inputs, and divs. Finding the right elements, however, can be challenging, especially when they lack unique IDs or class names. This guide will show you how to locate any Web element like a pro.

What are Web elements?

A Web element is an individual entity rendered on a Web page. Everything a user sees on a Web page (and even some things they don’t see) are elements: title headers, okay buttons, input fields, text areas, and more. Elements are specified in HTML by tag name, attributes, and contents. They may also have child elements, such as a table containing rows. CSS may be applied to elements to style them with colors, sizes, position, etc. Programming languages typically access Web elements as nodes in the Document Object Model (DOM).

What are Web element locators?

Web elements and locators are two different things. A Web element locator is an object that finds and returns Web elements on a page using a given query. In short, locators find elements.

Why are locators needed? As human users, we interact with Web pages visually: We look, scroll, click, and type through a browser. However, test automation interacts with Web pages programmatically: it needs a coded way to find and manipulate those same elements. Traditional automation won’t “look” at the page like a human* – it will search the DOM instead.

(*Newer automation technologies enable visual testing, which will be discussed later in this article.)

Selenium WebDriver separates the concerns of element location and interaction. WebDriver calls for these two concerns are frequently written back-to-back:

// WebDriver example: typing a search phrase at www.google.com
// This code is written in C#, but the calls are the same in any language

// First, element location
IWebElement searchField = driver.FindElement(By.Name("q"));

// Second, element interaction
searchField.SendKeys("panda");

WebDriver provides the following locator query types using “By”:

Which one is best? We’ll discuss that below.

Locators may also return multiple elements, or none at all! For example:

// Get the list of results from a Google search
// Using "FindElements" will return a list of all elements found in order
// Using "FindElement" would return the first element found (or throw an exception if no elements were found)
IList<IWebElement> results = driver.FindElements(By.CssSelector("div.r"));
results.Count.Should().BeGreaterThan(0);

Large test frameworks often use design patterns for structuring locators and interactions. The Page Object Model organizes locators and action methods together in classes by page or component. However, I strongly recommend the Screenplay Pattern over page objects because its pieces are more reusable and scalable. Whatever the pattern, locators are needed.

How do I find elements?

Elements can be a hassle to find when writing locators for test automation. To simplify my work flow, I use Google Chrome’s Developer Tools side-by-side with my IDE. Why choose Chrome?

To inspect any Web page in Chrome, simply right-click anywhere on the page:

Voila! DevTools will open. For finding Web elements, we want to use the Elements tab.

Visually pinpointing an element is easy. Click the “select” tool in the upper-left corner of the DevTools pane. (It looks like a square with a cursor on it.) The icon should turn blue.

Then, move the cursor to the desired element on the page. You will see each element highlighted in different colors as the mouse moves over. The corresponding HTML source code in the Elements tab will simultaneously be highlighted, too. Nice! Click on the desired element to set the highlighting so that it won’t disappear when you move the cursor elsewhere.

From here, you can check out the element’s tag, classes, attributes, contents, parents, and children.

How do I write good locators?

Finding the element is half the battle. Forming a unique locator query is the other half. If a locator is too broad, then it could return false positives. However, if a locator is too specific, then it could be susceptible to break whenever the DOM changes, and it could also be difficult for others to read. The best philosophy is this: Write the simplest locator query that uniquely identifies the target element(s).

My locator query type order-of-preference is:

  1. ID (if unique)
  2. Name (if unique)
  3. Class name
  4. CSS Selector
  5. XPath without text or indexing
  6. Link text / partial link text
  7. XPath with text and/or indexing

Unique IDs, names, and class names make locators super easy to write: queries are short and don’t need extra anchors. Always encourage developers on the team to use unique identifiers like class names for all elements. However, many elements do not have them, which means locators must fall back on more complicated CSS selectors and XPaths (*shiver*). Whenever this happens, here’s some advice:

  • Use parents as anchors if they have unique identifiers.
    • CSS selector example: “#some-list > li”
    • XPath example: “//ul[@id=’some-list’]/li”
  • Avoid XPaths that use text or indexing if possible.
    • Bad example: “//div[3]//span[text()=’hello’]”
    • Those tend to be the most brittle checks.
  • Use the “contains” function when checking for classes in XPath.
    • Example: “//div[contains(@class, ‘some-class’)]”
    • Elements frequently have more than one class.
    • “contains” will check a substring instead of the full class string.
    • However, be careful because “some-class2” would be matched!

Always test locators, too. Syntax errors and false positives happen frequently. Chrome DevTools makes testing locators easy. Simply hit Ctrl-F on the Elements tab and then paste the locator query into the finder field. DevTools will highlight all the matching elements in order. Spiffy!

Sometimes, when I can’t figure out why a locator isn’t working for a test case, I’ll do the following:

  1. Run the test case with debugging from my IDE.
  2. Set a break point on the locator.
  3. Wait for the test case to stop at the break point.
  4. Enter DevTools on the active Chrome window.
  5. Check the DOM and test the locators on the live page.

What if my tests are flaky?

Web UI testing is roundly criticized for being “flaky” because tests often crash for unexpected reasons. However, much of the unreliability people hit with Web UI testing (and often with Selenium WebDriver itself) is that all Web interactions inherently pose race conditions. The automation and the browser execute independently, so interactions must be synchronized with page state. Otherwise, WebDriver will throw exceptions for timeouts, stale elements, and elements not found. Many times, these issues happen intermittently, so they can be difficult to trace and resolve.

The best way to avoid race conditions is this: Always wait for an element to exist before interacting with it. This may seem basic, but it’s easy to overlook. Selenium WebDriver packages all offer some sort of WebDriverWait object that will force the driver to wait for a given condition to be true before proceeding. The easiest way to check if an element exists is to check if the list of elements returned by a FindElements (plural) call is non-empty. Adding another call for each interaction may feel burdensome, but design patterns within well-designed frameworks (like the Screenplay Pattern) can make these checks happen automatically.

Another good practice is this: Always fetch fresh elements. Sometimes, automation will first get some elements and then use a second query to get more elements. Or, in the case of the Page Object Factory (which should never be used because, bluntly, its design is terrible), elements are fetched once when the page object is constructed and referenced thereafter. No matter which way, the longer a Web element object exists, the more prone it is to become stale and cause exceptions. I’ve seen elements turn stale inexplicably even when they still seem to be on the page, too. Always get an element in the moment when it is needed. That way, it can’t go stale!

Want some helpful tips for clicking tricky elements? Check out this article: Clicking Web Elements with Selenium WebDriver.

How can AI help Web UI testing?

Several new AI-based projects/products aim to improve automated Web UI testing over traditional methods:

  • Applitools extends Selenium WebDriver automation with checks for nontrivial visual differences.
  • Testim can automatically heal locators whenever they break, avoiding test flakiness due to front-end changes.
  • Mabl is an assistant that will learn and rerun tests that developers teach it without writing any code.
  • Test.ai runs common user tests like login, searching, and shopping on mobile apps based on what its AI has learned from several other apps.
  • Rainforest QA uses crowdsourcing plus AI to run manual tests specified by a team almost like they are automated.

Test Automation University also offers a free course on using AI for element selection: AI for Element Selection: Erasing the Pain of Fragile Test Scripts.

Many AI testing tools definitely add value, but keep in mind, under the hood, locators are still used somewhere.

EGAD! How Do We Start Writing (Better) Tests?

Some have never automated tests and can’t check themselves before they wreck themselves. Others have 1000s of tests that are flaky, duplicative, and slow. Wa-do-we-do? Well, I gave a talk about this problem at a few Python conferences. The language used for example code was Python, but the principles apply to any language.

Here’s the PyTexas 2019 talk:

And here’s the PyGotham 2018 talk:

And here’s the first time I gave this talk, at PyOhio 2018:

I also gave this talk at PyCaribbean 2019 and PyTennessee 2020 (as an impromptu talk), but it was not recorded.

Clicking Web Elements with Selenium WebDriver

Selenium WebDriver is the most popular open source package for Web UI test automation. It allows tests to interact directly with a web page in a live browser. However, using Selenium WebDriver can be very frustrating because basic interactions often lack robustness, causing intermittent errors for tests.

The Basics

One such vulnerable interaction is clicking elements on a page. Clicking is probably the most common interaction for tests. In C#, a basic click would look like this:

webDriver.FindElement(By.Id("my-id")).Click();

This is the easy and standard way to click elements using Selenium WebDriver. However, it will work only if the targeted element exists and is visible on the page. Otherwise, the WebDriver will throw exceptions. This is when programmers pull their hair out.

Waiting for Existence

To avoid race conditions, interactions should not happen until the target element exists on the page. Even split-second loading times can break automation. The best practice is to use explicit waits before interactions with a reasonable timeout value, like this:

const int timeoutSeconds = 15;
var ts = new TimeSpan(0, 0, timeoutSeconds);
var wait = new WebDriverWait(webDriver, ts);

wait.Until((driver) => driver.FindElements(By.Id("my-id")).Count > 0);
webDriver.FindElement(By.Id("my-id")).Click();

Other Preconditions

Sometimes, Web elements won’t appear without first triggering something else. Even if the element exists on the page, the WebDriver cannot click it until it is made visible. Always look for the proper way to make that element available for clicking. Click on any parent panels or expanders first. Scroll if necessary. Make sure the state of the system should permit the element to be clickable.

If the element is scrolled out of view, move to the element before clicking it:

new Actions(webDriver)
    .MoveToElement(webDriver.FindElement(By.Id("my-id")))
    .Click()
    .Perform();

Last Ditch Efforts

Nevertheless, there are times when clickable elements just don’t cooperate. They just can’t seem to be made visible. When all else fails, drop directly into JavaScript:

((IJavaScriptExecutor)webDriver).ExecuteScript(
    "arguments[0].click();",
    webDriver.FindElement(By.Id("my-id")));

Do this only when absolutely necessary. It is a best practice to use Selenium WebDriver methods because they make automated interaction behave more like a real user than raw JavaScript calls. Make sure to give good reasons in code comments whenever doing this, too.

Final Advice

This article was written specifically for clicks, but its advice can be applied to other sorts of interactions, too. Just be smart about waits and preconditions.

Note: Code examples on this page are written in C#, but calls are similar for other languages supported by Selenium WebDriver.

The Airing of Grievances: Selenium WebDriver

Selenium WebDriver is the de facto standard for Web UI automation. It’s a great tool, but like anything good, it can also be misused. And that’s where I have grievances. I got a lot of problems with Selenium WebDriver abuses, and now you’re gonna hear about it!

WebDriver “Unit Tests”

“WebDriver unit tests” are like square circles – definitionally, they are logical fallacies. In my books, a unit test must be white box, meaning it has direct access to the product code. However, Web UI tests using WebDriver are inherently black box tests because they are interacting with an actively running website. Thus, they must be above-unit tests by definition. Don’t call them unit tests!

Making Every Test a Web Test

NO! The Testing Pyramid is vital to a healthy overall testing strategy. Web tests are great because they test a website in the ways a user would interact with it, but they have a significant cost. As compared to lower-level tests, they are more fragile, they require more development resources, and they take much more time to run. Browser differences may also affect testing. Furthermore, problems in lower level components should be caught at those lower levels! Sure, HTTP 400s and 500s will appear at the web app layer, but they would be much faster to find and fix with service layer tests. Different layers of testing mitigate risk at their optimal returns-on-investment.

No WebDriver Cleanup

Every WebDriver instance spawns a new system process for “driving” web browser interactions. When the test automation process completes, the WebDriver process may not necessary terminate with it. It is imperative that test automation quits the WebDriver instance once testing is complete. Make sure cleanup happens even when abortive exceptions occur! Otherwise, zombie WebDriver processes may continue on the test machine, causing any number of problems: locked files and directories, high memory usage, wasted CPU cycles, and blocked network ports. These problems can cripple a system and even break future test runs, especially on shared testing machines (like Jenkins nodes). Please, only you can stop the zombie apocalypse – always quit WebDriver instances!

Using “Close” Instead of “Quit”

Regardless of programming language, the WebDriver class has both “close” and “quit” methods. “Close” will close the current browser tab or window, while “quit” will close all windows and terminate the WebDriver process. Make sure to quit during final cleanup. Doing only a close may result in zombie WebDriver processes. It’s a rookie mistake.

Not Optimizing Setup/Cleanup with Service Calls

Web tests are notoriously slow. Whenever you can speed them up, do it! Some tests can be optimized by preparing initial state with service calls. For example, let’s say a user visiting a car dealership website needs to have favorite cars pre-selected for a comparison page test. Rather than navigating to a bunch of car pages and clicking a “favorite” icon, make a setup routine that calls a service to select favorites. Not all tests can do this sort of optimization, but definitely do it for those that can!

Web Elements with No ID

Developers, we need to talk – give every significant element a unique ID. PLEASE! WebDriver calls are so much easier to write and so much more robust to run when locator queries can use IDs instead of CSS selectors or XPaths. Let’s pick ID names during our Three Amigos meetings so that I can program the tests while you develop the features. Determining what elements are import should be easy based on our wireframes. You will save us automators so much time and frustration, since we won’t need to dig through HTML and wonder why our XPaths don’t work.

Changing Web Elements Without Warning

Hey, another thing, developers – don’t change the web page structure without telling us! WebDriver locator queries will break if you change the web elements. Even a seemingly innocuous change could wipe out hundreds of tests. Automation effort is non-trivial. Changes must be planned and sized with automation considerations in mind.

Not Using the Page Object Model

The Page Object Model is a widely-used design pattern for modeling a web page (or components on a web page) as an object in terms of its web elements and user interactions with it. It abstracts Web UI interactions into a common layer that can be reused by many different tests. (The Screenplay pattern, also good, is an evolution of the Page Object Model; tutorial here.) Not using the Page Object Model is Selenium suicide. It will result in rampant code duplication.

Demonizing XPath

XPaths have long been criticized for being slower than CSS selectors. That claim is outdated baloney. In many cases, XPaths outperform CSS selectors – see here, here, and here. Another common complaint is that XPath syntax is more complicated than CSS selector syntax. Honestly, I think they’re about the same in terms of learning curve. XPaths are also more powerful that CSS selectors because they can uniquely pinpoint any element on the page.

Inefficient Web Element Access

Web element IDs make access extremely efficient. However, when IDs are not provided, other locator query types are needed. It is always better to use locator queries to pinpoint elements, rather than to get a list of elements (or even a parent/child chain) to traverse using programming code. For example, I often see code reviews in which an XPath returns a list of results with text labels, and then the programming code (C# or Java or whatever) has a for loop that iterates over each element in the list and exits when the element with the desired label is found. Just add “[text()=’desired text’]” or “[contains(text(), ‘desired text’)]” to the XPath! Use locator queries for all they’re worth.

Interacting with Web Elements Before the Page is Ready

Web UI test automation is inherently full of race conditions. Make sure the elements are ready before calling them, or else face a bunch of “element not found” exceptions. Use WebDriver waits for efficient waiting. Do not use hard sleeps (like Java’s Thread.sleep).

Untuned Timeouts

WebDriver calls need timeouts, or else they could hang forever if there is a problem. (Check online docs for default timeout values.) Timeout value ought to be tuned appropriately for different test environments and different websites. Timeouts that are too short will unnecessarily abort tests, while timeouts that are too long will lengthen precious test runtime.

Cucumber-JVM for Java

This post is a concise-yet-comprehensive overview of Cucumber-JVM for Java. It is an introduction, a primer, a guide, and a reference. If you are new to BDD, please learn about it before using Cucumber-JVM.

Introduction

cucumber-logo-d727c551ce-seeklogo-com

Cucumber is an open-source software test automation framework for behavior-driven development. It uses a business-readable, domain-specific language called Gherkin for specifying feature behaviors that become tests. The Cucumber project started in 2008 when Aslak Hellesøy released the first version of the Cucumber framework for Ruby.

Cucumber-JVM is the official port for Java. Every Gherkin step is “glued” to a step definition method that executes the step. The English text of a step is glued using annotations and regular expressions. Cucumber-JVM integrates nicely with other testing packages. Anything that can be done with Java can be handled by Cucumber-JVM. Cucumber-JVM is ideal for black-box, above-unit, functional tests.

[Update on 7/29/2018: As of version 3.0.0, Cucumber-JVM no longer supports JVM languages other than Java – namely Groovy, Scala, Clojure, and Gosu. Please read Cucumber-JVM is dropping support of JVM Languages on the official Cucumber blog. The Gherkin parser is also now written in Go instead of in Java.]

Example Projects

Github contains two Cucumber-JVM example projects for this guide:

The projects use Java, Apache Maven, Selenium WebDriver, and AssertJ. The README files include practice exercises as well.

Prerequisite Skills

To be successful with Cucumber-JVM for Java, the following skills are required:

Prerequisite Tools

Test machines must have the Java Development Kit (JDK) installed to build and run Cucumber-JVM tests. They should also have the desired build tool installed (such as Apache Maven). The build tool should automatically install Cucumber-JVM packages through dependency management.

An IDE such as JetBrains IntelliJ IDEA (with the Cucumber for Java plugin) or Eclipse (with the Cucumber JVM Eclipse Plugin) is recommended for Cucumber-JVM test automation development. Software configuration management (SCM) with a tool like Git is also strongly recommended.

Versions

Cucumber-JVM 2.0 was released in August 2017 and should be used for new Cucumber-JVM projects. Releases may be found under Maven Group ID io.cucumber. Older Cucumber-JVM 1.x versions may be found under Maven Group ID info.cukes.

Build Management

Apache Maven is the preferred build management tool for Cucumber-JVM projects. All Cucumber-JVM packages are available from the Maven Central Repository. Maven can automatically run Cucumber-JVM tests as part of the build process. Projects using Cucumber-JVM should follow Maven’s Standard Directory Layout. The examples use Maven. Gradle may also be used, but it requires extra setup.

Every Maven project has a POM file for configuration. The POM should contain appropriate Cucumber-JVM dependencies. There is a separate package for each JVM language, dependency injection framework, and underlying unit test runner. Since Cucumber-JVM is a test framework, its dependencies should use test scope. Check io.cucumber on the Maven site for the latest packages and versions.

Project Structure

Cucumber-JVM test automation has the same layered approach as other BDD frameworks:

BDD Automation Layers.png

The higher layers focus more on specification, while the lower layers focus more on implementation. Gherkin feature files and step definition classes are BDD-specific.

Cucumber-JVM tests may be included in the same project as product code or in a separate project. Either way, projects using Cucumber-JVM should follow Maven’s Standard Directory Layout: test code should be located under src/test.

Cucumber-JVM Example Project

Screenshot of the example project from IntelliJ IDEA’s Project view.

Gherkin Feature Files

Gherkin feature files are text files that contain Gherkin behavior scenarios. They use the “.feature” extension. In a Maven project, they belong under src/test/resources, since they are not Java source files. They should also be organized into a sensible package hierarchy. Refer to other BDD pages for writing good Gherkin.

Gherkin Feature File

A feature file from the example projects, opened in IntelliJ IDEA.

Step Definition Classes

Step definition classes are Java classes containing methods that implement Gherkin steps. Step def classes are like regular Java classes: they have variables, constructors, and methods. Steps are “glued” to methods using regular expressions. Feature file scenarios can use steps from any step definition class in the project. In a Maven project, step defs belong in packages under src/test/java, and their class names should end in “Steps”.

The Basics

Below is a step definition class from the cucumber-jvm-java-example project, which uses the traditional method annotation style for step defs as part of the cucumber-java package. Each method should throw Throwable so that exceptions are raised up to the Cucumber-JVM framework.

package com.automationpanda.example.stepdefs;

import com.automationpanda.example.pages.GooglePage;
import cucumber.api.java.After;
import cucumber.api.java.Before;
import cucumber.api.java.en.Given;
import cucumber.api.java.en.Then;
import cucumber.api.java.en.When;
import org.openqa.selenium.WebDriver;
import org.openqa.selenium.chrome.ChromeDriver;

import static org.assertj.core.api.Assertions.assertThat;

public class GoogleSearchSteps {

  private WebDriver driver;
  private GooglePage googlePage;

  @Before(value = "@web", order = 1)
  public void initWebDriver() throws Throwable {
    driver = new ChromeDriver();
  }

  @Before(value = "@google", order = 10)
  public void initGooglePage() throws Throwable {
    googlePage = new GooglePage(driver);
  }

  @Given("^a web browser is on the Google page$")
  public void aWebBrowserIsOnTheGooglePage() throws Throwable {
    googlePage.navigateToHomePage();
  }

  @When("^the search phrase \"([^\"]*)\" is entered$")
  public void theSearchPhraseIsEntered(String phrase) throws Throwable {
    googlePage.enterSearchPhrase(phrase);
  }

  @Then("^results for \"([^\"]*)\" are shown$")
  public void resultsForAreShown(String phrase) throws Throwable {
    assertThat(googlePage.pageTitleContains(phrase)).isTrue();
  }

  @After(value = "@web")
  public void disposeWebDriver() throws Throwable {
    driver.quit();
  }
}

Alternatively, in Java 8, step definitions may be written using lambda expressions. As shown in the cucumber-jvm-java8-example project, lambda-style step defs are more concise and may be defined dynamically. The cucumber-java8 package is required:

package com.automationpanda.example.stepdefs;

import com.automationpanda.example.pages.GooglePage;
import cucumber.api.Scenario;
import cucumber.api.java8.En;
import org.openqa.selenium.WebDriver;
import org.openqa.selenium.chrome.ChromeDriver;

import static org.assertj.core.api.Assertions.assertThat;

public class GoogleSearchSteps implements En {

  private WebDriver driver;
  private GooglePage googlePage;

  // Warning: Make sure the timeouts for hooks using a web driver are zero

  public GoogleSearchSteps() {
    Before(new String[]{"@web"}, 0, 1, (Scenario scenario) -> {
      driver = new ChromeDriver();
    });
    Before(new String[]{"@google"}, 0, 10, (Scenario scenario) -> {
      googlePage = new GooglePage(driver);
    });
    Given("^a web browser is on the Google page$", () -> {
      googlePage.navigateToHomePage();
    });
    When("^the search phrase \"([^\"]*)\" is entered$", (String phrase) -> {
      googlePage.enterSearchPhrase(phrase);
    });
    Then("^results for \"([^\"]*)\" are shown$", (String phrase) -> {
      assertThat(googlePage.pageTitleContains(phrase)).isTrue();
    });
    After(new String[]{"@web"}, (Scenario scenario) -> {
      driver.quit();
    });
  }
}

Either way, steps from any feature file are glued to step definition methods/lambdas from any class at runtime:

Step Def Glue

Gluing a Gherkin step to its Java definition using regular expressions. IDEs have features to automatically generate definition stubs for steps.

For best practice, class inheritance should also be avoided – step bindings in superclasses will trigger DuplicateStepDefinitionException exceptions at runtime, and any step definition concern handled by inheritance can be handled better with other design patterns. Class constructors should be used primarily for dependency injection, while setup operations should instead be handled in Before hooks.

Hooks

Scenarios sometimes need automation-centric setup and cleanup routines that should not be specified in Gherkin. For example, web tests must first initialize a Selenium WebDriver instance. Step definition classes can have Before and After hooks that run before and after a scenario. They are analogous to setup and teardown methods from other test frameworks like JUnit. Hooks may optionally specify tags for the scenarios to which they apply, as well as an order number. They are similar to Aspect-Oriented Programming. After hooks will run even if a scenario has an exception or abortive assertion – use them for cleanup routines instead of Gherkin steps to guarantee cleanup runs.

The code snippet below shows Before and After hooks from the traditional-style example project. The order given to the Before hooks guarantees the web driver is initialized before the page object is created.

  @Before(value = "@web", order = 1)
  public void initWebDriver() throws Throwable {
    driver = new ChromeDriver();
  }

  @Before(value = "@google", order = 10)
  public void initGooglePage() throws Throwable {
    googlePage = new GooglePage(driver);
  }

  @After(value = "@web")
  public void disposeWebDriver() throws Throwable {
    driver.quit();
  }

Before and After hooks surround scenarios only. Cucumber-JVM does not provide hooks to surround the whole test suite. This protects test case independence but makes global setup and cleanup challenging. The best workaround is to use the singleton pattern with lazy initialization. The solution is documented in Cucumber-JVM Global Hook Workarounds.

Dependency Injection

Cucumber-JVM supports dependency injection (DI) as a way to share objects between step definition classes. For example, steps in different classes may need to share the same web driver instance. Cucumber-JVM supports many DI modules, and each has its own dependency package. As a warning, do not use static variables for sharing objects between step definition classes – static variables can break test independence and parallelization.

PicoContainer is the simplest DI framework and is recommended for most needs. Dependency injection hinges upon step definition class constructors. Without DI, step def constructors must not have parameters. With DI, PicoContainer will automatically construct each object in a step def constructor signature and pass them in when the step def object is constructed. Furthermore, the same object is injected into all step def classes that have its type as a constructor parameter. Objects that require constructor parameters should use a holder or caching class to provide the necessary arguments. Note that dependency-injected objects are created fresh for each scenario.

Below is a trivial example for how to apply dependency injection using PicoContainer to initialize the web driver in the example projects. (A more advanced example would read browser type from a config file and set the web driver accordingly.)

public class WebDriverHolder {
  private WebDriver driver;
  public WebDriver getDriver() {
    return driver;
  }
  public void initWebDriver() {
    driver = new ChromeDriver();
  }
}

public class GoogleSearchSteps {
  private WebDriverHolder holder;
  public GoogleSearchSteps(WebDriverHolder holder) {
    this.holder = holder;
  }
  @Before
  public void initWebDriver() throws Throwable {
    if (holder.getDriver() == null)
      holder.initWebDriver();
  }
}

Automation Support Classes

Automation support classes are extra classes outside of the Cucumber-JVM framework itself that are needed for test automation. They could come from the same test project, a separate but proprietary package, or an open-source package. Regardless of the source, they should fold into build management. They can integrate seamlessly with Cucumber-JVM. Step definitions should be very short because the bulk of automation work should be handled by support classes for maximum code reusability.

Popular open-source Java packages for test automation support are:

Page objects, file readers, and data processors also count as support classes.

Configuration Files

Configuration files are extra files outside of the Cucumber-JVM framework that provide environment-specific data to the tests, such as URLs, usernames, passwords, logging/reporting settings, and database connections. They should be saved in standard formats like CSV, XML, JSON, or Java Properties, and they should be read into memory once at the start of the test suite using global hook workarounds. The automation code should look for files at predetermined locations or using paths passed in as environment variables or properties.

Not all test automation projects need config files, but many do. Never hard-code config data into the automation code. Avoid non-text-based formats like Microsoft Excel so that version control can easily do diffs, and avoid non-standard formats that require custom parsers because they require extra development and maintenance time.

Running Tests

Cucumber-JVM tests may be run in a number of ways.

Using JUnit or TestNG

The cucumber-junit and cucumber-testng packages enable JUnit and TestNG respectively to run Cucumber-JVM tests. They require test runner classes that provide CucumberOptions for how to run the tests. A project may have more than one runner class. The example projects use the JUnit runner like this:

package com.automationpanda.example.runners;

import cucumber.api.CucumberOptions;
import cucumber.api.junit.Cucumber;
import org.junit.runner.RunWith;

@RunWith(Cucumber.class)
@CucumberOptions(
  plugin = {"pretty", "html:target/cucumber", "junit:target/cucumber.xml"},
  features = "src/test/resources/com/automationpanda/example/features",
  glue = {"com.automationpanda.example.stepdefs"})
public class PandaCucumberTest {
}

JUnit and TestNG runners can also be picked up by build management tools. For example, Maven will automatically run any runner classes named *Test.java during the test phase and *IT.java during the verify phase. Be sure to include the clean option to delete old test results. Avoid duplicate test runs by making sure runner classes do not cover the same tests – use tags to avoid duplicate coverage.

Using the Command Line Runner

Cucumber-JVM provides a CLI runner that can run feature files directly from the command line. To use it, invoke:

java cucumber.api.cli.Main

Run with “–help” to see all available options.

Using IDEs

Both JetBrains IntelliJ IDEA (with the Cucumber for Java plugin) and Eclipse (with the Cucumber JVM Eclipse Plugin) are great IDEs for Cucumber-JVM test development. They provide features for linking steps to definitions, generating definition stubs, and running tests with various options.

Cucumber Options

Cucumber options may be specified either in a runner class or from the command line as a Java system property. Set options from the command line using “-Dcucumber.options” – it will work for any java or mvn command. To see all available options, set the options to “–help”, or check the official Cucumber-JVM doc page.

The most useful option is probably the tags option. Selecting tags to run dynamically at runtime, rather than statically in runner classes, is very useful. In Cucumber-JVM 2.0, tag expressions use a basic English Boolean language:

@automated and @web
@web or @service
not @manual
(@web or @service) and (not @wip)

Older version of Cucumber-JVM used a more complicated syntax with tildes and commas.

Parallel Execution

Parallel test execution greatly reduces total start-to-end testing time. However, it requires additional machines to run tests, tools and config to handle parallel runs, and tests to be written to avoid collisions. As of version 4.0.0, Cucumber-JVM supports parallel execution out of the box. Previously, the most common way to do parallel test runs in Cucumber-JVM was to use a Maven plugin like the Cucumber-JVM Parallel Plugin or the Cucable plugin from Trivago.

[Update on 9/24/2018: Mentioned that Cucumber-JVM supports parallel execution starting with version 4.0.0.]

References