Python Testing 101: pytest-bdd

Warning: If you are new to BDD, then I strongly recommend reading the BDD 101 series before trying to use pytest-bdd. Also, make sure that you are already familiar with the pytest framework.

Overview

pytest-bdd is a behavior-driven (BDD) test framework that is very similar to behaveCucumber and SpecFlow. BDD frameworks are very different from more traditional frameworks like unittest and pytest. Test scenarios are written in Gherkin “.feature” files using plain language. Each Given, When, and Then step is “glued” to a step definition – a Python function decorated by a matching string in a step definition module. This means that there is a separation of concerns between test cases and test code. Gherkin steps may also be reused by multiple scenarios.

pytest-bdd is very similar to other Python BDD frameworks like behave, radish, and lettuce. However, unlike the others, pytest-bdd is not a standalone framework: it is a plugin for pytest. Thus, all of pytest‘s features and plugins can be used with pytest-bdd. This is a huge advantage!

Installation

Use pip to install both pytest and pytest-bdd.

pip install pytest
pip install pytest-bdd

Project Structure

Project structure for pytest-bdd is actually pretty flexible (since it is based on pytest), but the following conventions are recommended:

  • All test code should appear under a test directory named “tests”.
  • Feature files should be placed in a test subdirectory named “features”.
  • Step definition modules should be placed in a test subdirectory named “step_defs”.
  • conftest.py files should be located together with step definition modules.

Other names and hierarchies may be used. For example, large test suites can have feature-specific directories of features and step defs. pytest should be able to discover tests anywhere under the test directory.

[project root directory]
|‐‐ [product code packages]
|-- [test directories]
|   |-- features
|   |   `-- *.feature
|   `-- step_defs
|       |-- conftest.py
|       `-- test_*.py
`-- [pytest.ini|tox.ini|setup.cfg]

Note: Step definition module names do not need to be the same as feature file names. Any step definition can be used by any feature file within the same project.

Example Code

An example project named behavior-driven-python located in GitHub shows how to write tests using pytest-bdd. This section will explain how the Web tests are designed.

The top layer for pytest-bdd tests is the set of Gherkin feature files. Notice how the scenario below is concise, focused, meaningful, and declarative:

@web @duckduckgo
Feature: DuckDuckGo Web Browsing
  As a web surfer,
  I want to find information online,
  So I can learn new things and get tasks done.

  # The "@" annotations are tags
  # One feature can have multiple scenarios
  # The lines immediately after the feature title are just comments

  Scenario: Basic DuckDuckGo Search
    Given the DuckDuckGo home page is displayed
    When the user searches for "panda"
    Then results are shown for "panda"

Each scenario step is “glued” to a decorated Python function called a step definition. Step definitions are written in Python test modules, as shown below:

import pytest
from pytest_bdd import scenarios, given, when, then, parsers
from selenium import webdriver
from selenium.webdriver.common.keys import Keys

# Constants

DUCKDUCKGO_HOME = 'https://duckduckgo.com/'

# Scenarios

scenarios('../features/web.feature')

# Fixtures

@pytest.fixture
def browser():
    b = webdriver.Firefox()
    b.implicitly_wait(10)
    yield b
    b.quit()

# Given Steps

@given('the DuckDuckGo home page is displayed')
def ddg_home(browser):
    browser.get(DUCKDUCKGO_HOME)

# When Steps

@when(parsers.parse('the user searches for "{phrase}"'))
def search_phrase(browser, phrase):
    search_input = browser.find_element_by_name('q')
    search_input.send_keys(phrase + Keys.RETURN)

# Then Steps

@then(parsers.parse('results are shown for "{phrase}"'))
def search_results(browser, phrase):
    links_div = browser.find_element_by_id('links')
    assert len(links_div.find_elements_by_xpath('//div')) > 0
    search_input = browser.find_element_by_name('q')
    assert search_input.get_attribute('value') == phrase

Notice how each Given/When/Then step has a function with an appropriate decorator. Arguments, such as the search “phrase,” may also be passed from step to function. pytest-bdd provides a few argument parsers out of the box and also lets programmers implement their own. (By default, strings are compared using equality.) One function can be decorated for many steps, too.

pytest fixtures may also be used by step functions. The code above uses a fixture to initialize the Firefox WebDriver before each scenario and then quit it after each scenario. Fixtures follow all the same rules, including scope. Any step function can use a fixture by declaring it as an argument. Furthermore, any “@given” step function that returns a value can also be used as a fixture. Please read the official docs for more info about fixtures with pytest-bdd.

One important, easily-overlooked detail is that scenarios must be explicitly declared in test modules. Unlike other BDD frameworks that treat feature files as the main scripts, pytest-bdd treats the “test_*.py” module as the main scripts (because that’s what pytest does). Scenarios may be specified explicitly using scenario decorators, or all scenarios in a list of feature files may be included implicitly using the “scenarios” shortcut function shown above.

To share steps across multiple feature files, add them to the “conftest.py” file instead of the test modules. Since scenarios must be declared within a test module, they can only use step functions available within the same module or in “conftest.py”. As a best practice, put commonly shared steps in “conftest.py” and feature-specific steps in the test module. The same recommendation also applies for hooks.

Scenario outlines require special implementation on the Python side to run successfully. Unfortunately, steps used by scenario outlines need unique step decorators and extra converting. Please read the official docs or the example project to see examples.

Test Launch

pytest-bdd can leverage the full power of pytest. Tests can be run in full or filtered by tag. Below are example commands using the example project:

# run all tests
pytest

# filter tests by test module
# note: feature files cannot be run directly
pytest tests/step_defs/test_unit_basic.py
pytest tests/step_defs/test_unit_outlines.py
pytest tests/step_defs/test_unit_service.py
pytest tests/step_defs/test_unit_web.py

# filter tests by tags
# running by tag is typically better than running by path
pytest -k "unit"
pytest -k "service"
pytest -k "web"
pytest -k "add or remove"
pytest -k "unit and not outline"

# print JUnit report
pytest -junitxml=/path/for/output

pytest-bdd tests can be executed and filtered together with regular pytest tests. Tests can all be located within the same directory. Tags work just like pytest.mark.

All other pytest plugins should work, too. For example:

Pros and Cons

Just like for other BDD frameworks, pytest-bdd is best suited for black-box testing because it forces the developer to write test cases in plain, descriptive language. In my opinion, it is arguably the best BDD framework currently available for Python because it rests on the strength and extendability of pytest. It also has PyCharm support (in the Professional Edition). However, it can be more cumbersome to use than behave due to the extra code needed for declaring scenarios, implementing scenario outlines, and sharing steps. Nevertheless, I would still recommend pytest-bdd over behave for most users because it is more powerful – pytest is just awesome!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s