PyCon 2020 is Cancelled: Here’s Why It Hurts and What We Can Do

PyCon 2020 was cancelled today due to COVID-19. You can read the official announcement here: https://pycon.blogspot.com/2020/03/pycon-us-2020-in-pittsburgh.html. I completely support the Python Software Foundation in this decision, and I can’t imagine how difficult these past few weeks must have been for them.

Although the news of PyCon’s cancellation is not surprising, it is nevertheless devastating for members of the Python community. Here’s why it hurts, from the perspective of a full-hearted Pythonista, and here’s what we can do about it.

Python is Community-Driven

A frequent adage among Pythonistas is, “Come for the language, and say for the community.” I can personally attest to this statement for myself. When I started using Python in earnest in 2015, I loved how clean, concise, and powerful the language was. I didn’t fully engage the Python community until PyCon 2018, but once I did, I never left because I felt like I became part of something greater than just a bunch of coders.

Python is community-driven. There’s no major company behind the Python language, like Oracle for Java or Microsoft for .NET. Pythonistas keep Python going, whether that’s by being a Python language core developer, a third-party package developer, a conference organizer, a meetup volunteer, a corporate sponsor, or just a coder using Python for projects. And the people in the community are awesome. We help each other. We support each other. We eschew arrogance, champion diversity, and practice inclusivity.

PyCon US is the biggest worldwide Python event of the year. Thousands of Pythonistas from around the world join together for days of tutorials, talks, and sprints. This is the only time that many of us get to see each other in person together. It’s also the only way some of us would have ever met each other. I think of my good mate Julian, co-founder of PyBites. We met by chance at PyCon 2018 in the “hallway track” (meaning, just walking around and meeting people), and we hit it off right away. Julian lives in Australia, while I live in the United States. We probably would never have met outside of PyCon. Since then, we’ve done video chats together and promoted each other’s blogs. We spent much time together at PyCon 2019 and hoped to have another blast at PyCon 2020. We even had plans for a bunch of us content developers to get together to party. Unfortunately, that time together must be postponed until 2021.

There are several other individuals I could name in addition to Julian, too. I’m sure there are several other groups of friends throughout the community who look to PyCon as the time to meet. Losing that opportunity is heartbreaking.

PyCon is a Spectacle

PyCon itself is not just a conference – it’s a spectacle. PyCon is the community’s annual celebration of creativity, innovation, and progress. Talks showcase exciting projects. Tutorials shed deep expertise on critical subjects. Sprints put rocket boosters underneath open source projects to get work done. Online recordings become mainstay resources for the topics they cover. Becoming a speaker at PyCon is truly a badge of honor. Sponsors shower attendees with more swag than a carry-on bag can hold: t-shirts, socks, stickers, yo-yos, autographed books, iPads, water bottles, gloves, Pokémon cards; the list goes on and on. Many sponsors even host after-parties with dinner and drinks. All of these activities combined make PyCon much more than just another conference or event.

PyCon is truly a time to shine. Anyone who attends PyCon catches the magic in the air. There’s an undeniable buzz. And the anticipation leading up to PyCon can be unbearable. It’s like when kids go to Disney World. I can’t tell you how many friends I’ve encouraged to go to PyCon.

At PyCon 2020, we had much to celebrate. Python is now one of the world’s most popular programming languages, according to several surveys. Python 2 reached end-of-life on January 1. There are more Python projects and resources than ever before. 2020 is also the start of a new decade. We can still celebrate them, but not en masse at PyCon this year.

PyCon Supports the PSF

The Python Software Foundation (PSF) is the non-profit organization that supports the Python language and community. Here’s what they do, copied directly from their website:

The Python Software Foundation (PSF) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation that holds the intellectual property rights behind the Python programming language. We manage the open source licensing for Python version 2.1 and later and own and protect the trademarks associated with Python. We also run the North American PyCon conference annually, support other Python conferences around the world, and fund Python related development with our grants program and by funding special projects.

PyCon is a major source of revenue for the PSF. I don’t know the ins and outs of the numbers, but I do know that cancelling PyCon will financially hurt the PSF, which will then affect what the PSF can do to carry out its mission. That’s no bueno.

What Can We Do?

Python is community-driven, and we are not powerless. Here are some things we can do as Pythonistas in light of PyCon 2020’s cancellation:

Support the Python Software Foundation. Openly and publicly thank the PSF for everything they have done. Offer heartfelt sympathies for the incredibly tough decisions they’ve had to make in recent weeks, because they made the unquestionably right decision here.

Join the Python Software Foundation. Anyone can become a member. There are varying levels of membership and commitment. Check out the PSF Membership FAQ for more info. Donations will greatly help the PSF through this tough time.

Engage your local Python community. The Python community is worldwide. Look for a local meetup. Attend regional Python conferences if possible – PyCon isn’t the only Python conference! The closest ones to where I live are PyGotham, PyOhio, and PyTennessee, and I’m helping to re-launch PyCarolinas.

Engage the online Python community. Even though many of us are practicing social distancing due to COVID-19, we can still keep in touch through the Internet. Support each other. Be intentional with good communication. Personally, I started using the hashtag #PythonStrong on Twitter.

Stay safe. COVID-19 is serious. Wherever you are, be smart and do the right things. For folks like me in the United States, that means social distancing right now.

Attend PyCon 2021. Since PyCon 2020 will be cancelled, we ought to make PyCon 2021 the best PyCon ever.

Python Strong

PyCon 2020’s cancellation is devastating but necessary. We shall overcome. Stay safe out there, Pythonistas. Stay #PythonStrong!

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