BDD 101: Automation

Better automation is one of BDD’s hallmark benefits. In fact, the main goal of BDD could be summarized as rapidly turning conceptualized behavior into automatically tested behavior. While the process and the Gherkin are universal, the underlying automation could be built using one of many frameworks.

This post explains how BDD automation frameworks work. It focuses on the general structure of the typical framework – it is not a tutorial on how to use any specific framework. However, I wrote short examples for each piece using Python’s behave framework, since learning is easier with examples. I chose to use Python here simply for its conciseness.

Framework Parts

Every BDD automation framework has five major pieces:

#1: Feature Files

Gherkin feature files are very much part of the automation. They act like test scripts – each scenario is essentially a test case. Previous posts covered Gherkin in depth.

Here is an example feature file named google_search.feature:

Feature: Google Searching
  As a web surfer, I want to search Google, so that I can learn new things.
  
  # This scenario should look familiar
  @automated @google-search @panda
  Scenario: Simple Google search
    Given a web browser is on the Google page
    When the search phrase "panda" is entered
    Then results for "panda" are shown

#2: Step Definitions

step definition is a code block that implements the logic to execute a step. It is typically a method or function with the English-y step phrase as an annotation. Step definitions can take in arguments, doc strings, and step tables. They may also make assertions to pass or fail a scenario. In most frameworks, data can be passed between steps using some sort of context object. When a scenario is executed, the driver matches each scenario step phrase to its step definition. (Most frameworks use regular expressions for phrase matching.) Thus, every step in a feature file needs a step definition.

The step definitions would be written in a Python source file like this:

from behave import *

@given('a web browser is on the Google page')
def step_impl(context):
  context.google_page.load();

@when('the search phrase "{phrase}" is entered')
def step_impl(context, phrase):
  context.google_page.search(phrase)

@then('the results for "{phrase}" are shown')
def step_impl(context, phrase):
  assert context.google_page.has_results(phrase)

#3: Hooks

Certain automation logic cannot be handled by step definitions. For example, scenarios may need special setup and cleanup operations. Most BDD frameworks provide hooks that can insert calls before or after Gherkin sections, typically filterable using tags. Hooks are similar in concept to aspect-oriented programming.

In behave, hooks are written in a Python source file named environment.py:

import page_objects
from selenium import webdriver

def before_all(context):
  context.browser = webdriver.Chrome()

def before_scenario(context):
  context.google_page = page_objects.GooglePage(context.browser)

def after_all(context):
  context.browser.quit()

#4: Shared Code

Shared code (a.k.a libraries or packages) refers to any code called by step definitions and hooks. Shared code could be dependency packages downloaded using managers like Maven (Java), NuGet (.NET), or PyPI (Python). For example, Selenium is a well-known package for web browser automation. Shared code could also be components to assist automation, such as page objects or other design patterns. As the cliché goes, “Don’t reinvent the wheel.” Step definitions and hooks should not contain all of the logic for running the actions – they should reuse common code as much as possible.

A Python page object class from the page_objects.py module could look like this:

class GooglePage(object):
  """A page object for the Google home page"""
  
  def __init__(self, browser):
    self.browser = browser
  
  def load():
    # put code here
    pass
  
  def search(phrase):
    # put code here
    pass
  
  def has_results(phrase):
    # put code here
    return False

#5: Driver

Every automation framework has a driver that runs tests, and BDD frameworks are no different. The driver executes each scenario in a feature file independently. Whenever a failure happens, the driver reports the failure and aborts the scenario. Drivers typically have discovery mechanisms for selecting scenarios to run based on tag names or file paths.

The behave driver can be launched from the command line like this:

> behave google_search.py --tags @panda

Automation Advantages

Even if a team does not apply behavior-driven practices to its full development process, BDD test frameworks still have some significant advantages over non-BDD test frameworks. First of all, steps make BDD automation very modular and thus reusable. Each step is an independent action, much like how each scenario is an independent behavior. Once a step definition is written, it may be reused by any number of scenarios. This is crucial, since most behaviors for a feature share common actions. And all steps are inherently self-documenting, since they are written in plain language. There is a natural connection between high-level behavior and low-level implementation.

Test execution also has advantages. Tags make it very easy to select tests to run, especially from the command line. Failures are very informative as well. The driver pinpoints precisely which step failed for which scenario. And since behaviors are isolated, a failure for one scenario is less likely to affect other test scenarios than would be the case for procedure-driven tests.

Available Frameworks

There are many BDD frameworks out there. The next post will introduce a few major frameworks for popular languages.

2 thoughts on “BDD 101: Automation

  1. Pingback: BDD 101: Frameworks – Automation Panda

  2. Pingback: Who Should Lead BDD? – Automation Panda

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