‑‑BDD; Automation without Collaboration

Does it make sense to use a BDD test automation framework on a team that does not follow a Behavior-Driven Development process? I’ve faced this questions a few times recently. Although some BDD benefits will be missing, the answer is still yes, BDD test automation frameworks are still useful apart from a full BDD process. This article covers strengths and weaknesses to explain why.

Strengths

BDD test frameworks force tests to be behavior-driven, not procedure-driven. Behavior-driven tests focus on individual behaviors, making them concise and comprehensible. Impertinent factors are removed from test cases. Imperative details are specified only when necessary. Test reports are more descriptive, and test results are more meaningful. Tests written without a behavior-driven framework are more likely to become long, unnecessarily complicated, and fragile.

BDD test frameworks also provide inherent structure with steps. Steps are the basic building blocks of test cases, regardless of the type of test automation framework used. While almost all run-of-the-mill test frameworks (like JUnit, xUnit.net, or pytest) provide structure to write separate, independent test cases (usually as methods or functions), they lack structure to write separate test case steps. Typically, programmers end up writing test case logic directly into the test methods/functions, or they write ad hoc helper methods/functions/classes to get the job done. This approach often lacks consistency (especially when multiple engineers contribute to the automation code), and thus reusability suffers and duplication creeps in. Gherkin steps are like guide rails for test cases.

Gherkin steps provide easy reusability for rapid development. In a mature automation code base, new test cases can be written using a few short lines of pre-existing steps. And pre-existing steps can be trusted to work because they’ve been tested before. Parametrized steps enable even greater reuse.

Gherkin steps are self-documenting because they are written in plain English. This makes tests easier to do many things:

  • to write, because it provides an outline for the test in plain language
  • to review, because others less familiar with the feature can quickly understand concise scenarios
  • to maintain, because problems can be pinpointed
  • to explain, because non-technical people can’t read code

Much like any other test frameworks, BDD frameworks integrate with other testing packages and design patterns. For example, it is common to use a BDD framework with Selenium WebDriver and the Page Object Model to do Web UI testing. Other common packages for needs like logging, assertions, and REST API calls also work well with BDD frameworks.

Finally, BDD test frameworks open the door to shifting left. They can be the starting point for QA-led BDD. Demonstrating the value in behavior-driven automation can open interest in Three Amigos collaboration, which can then lead to more process improvements and better software quality.

Weaknesses

BDD test frameworks require extra development overhead at first. They aren’t as simple to use as unit-like test frameworks. It also takes a lot of practice to write good Gherkin. I’ve talked with engineers (typically developers) who see the feature file layer as unnecessary “plaster” over test cases. Without full team collaboration and cooperation, the justification for BDD diminishes.

Strict behavior independence may also make execution time less efficient. While steps may be reused, common setup operations must be run for each test. CRUD operations illustrate this point well. In a BDD framework, each operation (create, retrieve, update, delete) would be covered by a separate test scenario. However, the operations are interdependent: a test must create a thing before it can delete the thing. Thus, the delete scenario will borrow some logic from the create scenario. A procedure-driven test could more efficiently stack steps into one test case like this: create, retrieve, update, retrieve, delete, retrieve. Assertions would be interleaved with operations. This one test case would cover multiple behaviors, but it would save execution time by avoiding repeated creations for setup and deletions for cleanups. Many times, people have even asked me if there is a way to sequence Gherkin scenarios together to achieve the same effect! (This is not possible, and it would violate test independence.)

If BDD frameworks are used without a BDD process, then BDD could become pigeonholed as a “QA thing,” forever banished to the realm of the far right (the opposite of shift left, not the political spectrum). This could raise barriers to collaboration if not handled properly.

Furthermore, the lack of the full BDD means that many BDD benefits will go missing. Miscommunications could still easily happen because biz and dev would not be involved in defining behavior scenarios. Delivery deadlines could still be missed because testing and automation cannot readily shift left. Out of the 12 major benefits of BDD, the first 4 would be lost.

Conclusion

Overall, I think the advantages of BDD test automation frameworks outweigh the disadvantages for most above-unit functional testing needs, regardless of whether or not a team uses a full BDD process. Ideally, a team would embrace full-BDD, but that’s not always reality. A “‑‑BDD;” situation (that’s a prefix decrement, to note that collaboration was missing before automation) can still be seen as a glass half-full.

2 thoughts on “‑‑BDD; Automation without Collaboration

  1. Pingback: BDD‑‑; Collaboration without Automation – Automation Panda

  2. Pingback: Testing Bits – 7/23/17 – 7/29/17 | Testing Curator Blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s