The Airing of Grievances: Test Automation Process

Test automation is a big deal for me. It is my chosen specialty within the broad field of software. When I see things done wrong, or when people just don’t get what it’s about, it really grinds my gears. I got a lot of problems with bad test automation processes, and now you’re gonna hear about it!

Saying “They’re Just Test Scripts”

Test automation is not just a bunch of test scripts: it is a full technology stack that requires design, integration, and expertise. Test automation development is a discipline. Saying it is just a bunch of test scripts is derogatory and demeaning. It devalues the effort test automation requires, which can lead to poor work item sizings and an “us vs. them” attitude between developers and QA.

Not Applying the Same Software Development Best Practices

Test automation is software development, and all the same best practices should thus apply. Write clean, well-designed code. Use version control with code reviews. Add comments and doc. Don’t get lazy because “they’re just test scripts” – wrong attitude!

Lip Service

Don’t say automation is important but then never dedicate time or resources to work on it. Don’t leave automation as a task to complete only if there’s time after manual testing is done. Make automation a priority, or else it will never get done! I once worked on an Agile team where automation framework stories were never included into the sprint because there weren’t “enough points to go around.” So, even though this company hired me explicitly to do test automation, I always got shunted into a manual testing scramble every sprint.

Confusing Test Automation with Deployment Automation

Test automation is the automation of test scenarios (for either functional or performance tests). Deployment automation is the automation of product build distribution and installation in a software environment. They are two different concerns. Cucumber is not Ansible.

Forcing 100% Automation

Some people think that automation will totally eliminate the need for any manual testing. That’s simply not true. Automation and manual testing are complementary. Automation should handle deterministic scenarios with a worthwhile return-on-investment to automate, while manual testing should focus on exploratory testing, user experience (UX), and tests that are too complicated to automate properly. Forcing 100% automation will make teams focus on metrics instead of quality and effectiveness.

Downsizing or Eliminating QA

Test automation doesn’t reduce or eliminate the need for testers. On the contrary, test automation requires even more advanced skills than old-school manual testing. There is still a need for testing roles, whether as a dedicated position or as shared collectively by a bunch of developers. The work done by that testing role just becomes more technical.

Saying Product Code and Test Code Must Use the Same Language

For unit tests, this is true, but for above-unit tests, it is simply false. Any general purpose programming language could be used to automate black-box tests. For example, Python tests could run against an Angular web app. A team may choose to use the same language for product and test code for simplicity, but it is not mandatory.

Not Classifying Test Types

Not all tests are the same. You can play buzzword bingo with all the different test type names: unit, integration, end-to-end, functional, performance, system, contract, exploratory, stress, limits, longevity, test-to-break, etc. Different tests need different tools or frameworks. Tests should also be written at the appropriate Testing Pyramid level.

Assuming All Tests Are Equal

Again, not all tests are the same, even within the same test type. Tests vary in development time, runtime, and maintenance time. It’s not accurate to compare individuals or teams merely on test numbers.

Not Prioritizing Tests to Automate

There’s never enough time to automate everything. Pick the most important ones to automate first – typically the core, highest-priority features. Don’t dilly-dally on unimportant tests.

Not Running Tests Regularly

Automated tests need to run at least once daily, if not continuously in Continuous Integration. Otherwise, the return-on-investment is just too low to justify the automation work. I once worked on a QA team that would run an automated test only once or twice during a 2-year release! How wasteful.

HP Quality Center / ALM

This tool f*&@$#! sucks. Don’t use it for automated tests. Pocket the money and just develop a good codebase with decent doc in the code, and rely upon other dashboards (like Jenkins or Kibana) for test reporting.

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