leadership

Who Should Lead BDD?

Behavior-driven development offers great benefits: better communication, easier test automation, and higher code quality. There are many ways for a team to start doing BDD, and naturally, someone needs to stand up and lead the effort. In my experience, adopting BDD is its own process. An evangelist converts team leaders, training sessions are given, and Gherkinized acceptance criteria start being automated. However, not everyone will embrace the changes, especially those across different role types. And big changes take time. Rome wasn’t built in a day, and neither will be a mature, effective BDD process.

This post covers three possible ways to lead BDD adoption, each from one of the Three Amigos roles. Any role can lead the charge, but each will have its unique struggles. These possibilities are advisory but not necessarily prescriptive. If you want to move your team into BDD, use these three approaches as guidelines for crafting a plan that best meets your needs. And, of course, the advice in Winning Support for BDD pertains to all approaches. Furthermore, as you read these approaches, put yourselves in the shoes of roles other than your own, so you can better understand the struggles each role faces.

Note: The approaches below presume that the underlying software development process is Agile Scrum. Nevertheless, they may be tweaked and applied to other processes, like Waterfall or Kanban.

The Starting Point

The starting point for all three approaches below is a “traditional” Agile sprint – one that is not (yet) behavior-driven. Product owners write user stories, developers implement the solutions, and testers test the deliverables. The diagram below shows the the main flow of sprint work in this type of sprint, and it will serve as the basis for illustrating BDD adoption:

Traditional Sprint

The overall flow of a “traditional,” non-behavior-driven Agile sprint. Ceremonies like planning, review, and retrospective should still happen, but the are left out of this diagram to put emphasis on parts affected by BDD.

QA-Led BDD

Circumstances

The most common approach I’ve seen is QA-led BDD adoption, because testers arguably have the most to gain. It is most applicable when the Three Amigos roles (biz, dev, and test) are well-defined and separate. The impetus for QA to lead BDD adoption could be that developers deliver code too late to adequately test and automate within a sprint, or it could be that the QA team is struggling to scale their test automation development. There may also be resistance to BDD from biz and dev roles.

Steps

The sensible path for QA is to start all the way to the right and progressively shift left. This means that the starting point would be test automation. Start by building a solid automation code base. Pick a well-supported BDD framework like Cucumber, SpecFlow, or behave, and start adding scenarios and step definitions. Select scenarios for core product features rather than the latest sprint stories, so that the code base will be populated with the most basic, useful steps. Once the automation code reaches a “critical mass” for step reusability, QA can then proactively classify new test scenarios as automated or manual. Automated tests become easier and easier to write, giving QA more time to be exploratory with manual testing. Ideally, all manual testing would become exploratory.

Then, it’s time to start shifting left. At this point, all Gherkin steps would be in the automation code only, so set up a tool like Pickles to expose the steps to all team members as living documentation. QA should then schedule Three Amigos meetings with biz and dev to proactively discuss user story expectations. In those meetings, QA should start demonstrating how to write acceptance criteria in Gherkin, which then expedites testing. A big win would be if a QA engineer could write a new scenario using only pre-existing, pre-automated steps and then run it successfully on the spot.

Once biz and dev folks are convinced of BDD’s benefits, encourage them to participate in writing Gherkin. When they get comfortable, encourage product owners to write acceptance criteria in Gherkin when they write user stories, and hold Three Amigos meetings before sprint planning as part of grooming. Convince them that for them to help write Gherkin scenarios is a process efficiency for the whole team.

 

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Struggles

Shifting left is never easy, especially when team members are hardened into their roles. That’s why QA must write both really good test automation and really good Gherkin scenarios. Success should speak for itself once QA delivers good automation fast. Furthermore, QA must be clear that BDD is not merely a test tool, it’s a process that requires a paradigm shift. Otherwise, BDD could be easily pigeonholed to be a “QA thing.”

Dev-Led BDD

Circumstances

There are a few reasons that could push developers to lead BDD. On some Agile teams, there’s no distinction between dev and QA roles: all team members are software engineers responsible for both developing and testing the software. Or, developers may not be satisfied with the testing effort. Maybe too many bugs are escaping the sprint, or maybe automation isn’t getting done in time. Or, perhaps the product owner is not happy with the deliverables and putting pressure on the team to do better. Whatever the circumstance, developers are more than capable of winning with BDD.

Steps

The best way for developers to start is to set up Three Amigos meetings, to stop the game of telephone between biz and test. In those meetings, start translating acceptance criteria into Gherkin. Then, start helping out with test automation – that may mean anything from offering advice to QA to building the framework from scratch. Then, start pushing left and right to get biz and test on board with BDD.

 

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Struggles

It may be difficult for developers to work on test automation because they may lack either the expertise or the time to devote to good test automation. Automation is a specialized discipline, and it takes time and diligence to build up expertise to do it right. I’ve seen very skilled developers haughtily build very shabby automation frameworks.

Developers must also be careful to not be too technical, or else biz and test roles may reject BDD for being too complicated or beyond their abilities. Furthermore, some teams may be resistant to developing test automation. For example, automation work may be “starved” for points because it is underestimated or similarly starved for time because it is deemed lower in priority to other work.

Biz-Led BDD

Circumstances

BDD is designed to bring technical and business roles together into healthier collaboration, and biz folks can certainly lead BDD adoption as successfully as more technical folks can. Major reasons for biz to take the lead could be if development is perpetually running behind schedule, if deliverables don’t meet the original requirements, or if software bugs are rampant.

Steps

For biz roles, “shift left” could be better called “pull left.” Start by writing solid user stories and Gherkin acceptance criteria. Focus on good Gherkin that is readable and reusable. Then, introduce BDD as a refinement to the Agile process, highlighting its benefits. Initiate Three Amigos meetings to make sure that you are communicating the right things to dev and test. Once collaboration is going well, suggest BDD automation as a way to expedite dev and test work. If acceptance criteria are all Gherkinized, then developing BDD automation would be a natural extension.

 

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Struggles

In my experience, biz roles (specifically product owners) tend to be the most hesitant about BDD. They often see writing Gherkin as a burdensome requirement rather than a way to help their team. Or, they may fear that BDD is “too technical” for them. It may also be difficult for them to pitch BDD automation to the team. To be successful, biz roles need to step outside their comfort zone to win supporters from dev and test.

Process paradigm shifts can be hard, especially on teams that are already overwhelmed with work. Some people just don’t like change. Process and automation change can also be a big challenge if QA is outsourced (which is common).

Side-By-Side Comparison

Here’s the TL;DR:

Role Circumstances Steps Struggles
QA
  • Code is delivered too late to test and automate
  • Automation development is not scaling
  1. Build a solid BDD automation framework
  2. Demonstrate automation success
  3. Set up Three Amigos meetings during the sprint
  4. Start writing Gherkin scenarios with biz and dev as part of grooming
  • Showing that BDD is a whole development process, not just a QA thing
  • Getting the team to truly shift left
Dev
  • No separation of dev and QA roles
  • Too many bugs are escaping the sprint
  • Pressure from biz to do better
  1. Initiate better collaboration through Three Amigos and Gherkin
  2. Push right by helping QA with testing and automation
  3. Push left by helping biz write better acceptance criteria
  • Humbly learning good automation practices
  • Dedicating time for automation and more meetings
Biz
  • Missed deadlines
  • Deliverables not matching expectations
  • Too many bugs
  1. Write acceptance criteria in good Gherkin
  2. Set up Three Amigos meetings to review Gherkin
  3. Pitch BDD automation
  • Learning semi-technical things
  • Pushing all the way to automation

Conclusion

These are just three general approaches intended to show how BDD is for everyone. If you have other approaches, please describe them in the comment section below! Whatever the approach, make sure to demonstrate that BDD helps everyone, or else people may feel forced into corners and reject BDD for bad reasons. And remember, software quality is not just QA’s responsibility; it is everyone’s responsibility.